iOS 14, iPadOS 14, tvOS 14, and watchOS 7 for Users and Developers somewhat mirrors macOS Big Sur in that there are some design tweaks like the new Widgets and your ability to place them on the home screen for device running iOS, the new App Library system, which can help you organize your home screen. Along with the home screen changes, search and Siri have seen some improvements as well, and those are covered. Safari can now help keep you informed about who is tracking you across the web.

Communications is a big part of today’s society, so the updates to Messages is covered, and there is a whole new help to help you translate text, called the Translate app. Users will be able to learn about the new updates to Notes, Reminders, and Maps. If you prefer to handwrite items there is a new feature just for you called called Scribble, which will take your handwriting and covert it into text.

Health is a huge topic and there have been some big changes like the renamed Fitness app on the iPhone and a way of tracking Sleep on the Apple Watch. These are both covered along with updates to Face ID and masks, as well as new ways to protect your hearing. The Music and Home apps have been slightly changed and updated and the Shortcuts app gets some new tricks to help automate things even better than before.

Developers will learn all about Apple Silicon, because their iOS and iPadOS apps can run natively on Macs running Apple Silicon. Along with Apple Silicon, developers can learn about changes to Xcode, the new Swift, SwiftUI, and Swift Packages, as well as how to implement WidgetKit, some things to keep in mind about AppClips, how to implement the new Color Picker and how to support PencilKit and Scribble with their custom interfaces.

Tag: update

  • wwriteLite 7.2.1 Now Available

    wwriteLite 7.2.1 Now Available

    There is an update to wwriteLite, to version 7.2.1. This is a minor bug fix that fixes an issue where you could not see the Markdown Preview text when using Dark mode and when the file being previewed is not using a template.

    As always this is a free wwriteLite and it is available now. You can view the full list of changes by checking out the Change Log on the wwriteLite website.

    Version 7.2.0 Notes
    It looks like Bill Lumbergh and Dom Portwood have finally decided to jump into the 21st century. They have decided that all TPS reports needs to be submitted in Markdown for easy conversion to HTML so they can be viewed on the Initech, LLC intranet, called Ininet. Therefore, wwriteLite now needs to be able to support Markdown.

    With version 7.2.0, you can now write Markdown, preview it by tapping on the Document icon in the toolbar. Once you have previewed your markdown you can import a CSS file from the Document Picker or via URL. Once used, the file will be downloaded and stored so you can use it on other files as well. You may also delete the CSS files by tapping on the “trash” icon in the menu bar.

    Also added in this version is a new “Open Source” screen which lists the open source libraries used within wwriteLite. This is accessed via the “About” screen.

    There is one tweak as well, the “Drag” icon has been removed and replaced with the Markdown Preview.

  • wwriteLite 7.2.0 Now Available

    wwriteLite 7.2.0 Now Available

    “Hey Peter, what’s happening?” It’s been about six weeks since the last wwriteLite update, and here we are with another one. This is a minor update, but it includes a big feature.

    It looks like Bill Lumbergh and Dom Portwood have finally decided to jump into the 21st century. They have decided that all TPS reports needs to be submitted in Markdown for easy conversion to HTML so they can be viewed on the Initech, LLC intranet, called Ininet. Therefore, wwriteLite now needs to be able to support Markdown.

    With version 7.2.0, you can now write a Markdown document and then preview it in HTML by tapping on the Document icon in the toolbar. Once you have previewed your markdown you can import a CSS file from the Document Picker or via URL. Once used, the file will be downloaded and stored so you can use it on other files as well. You may also delete the CSS files by tapping on the “trash” icon in the menu bar.

    Also added in this version is a new “Open Source” screen which lists the open source libraries used within wwriteLite. This is accessed via the “About” screen.

    There is one tweak that has been made to support the Markdown preview option. The “Drag File” button has been replaced with the Markdown Preview button.

    wwriteLite is a free update and is available now. You can view the full list of changes by checking out the Change Log on the wwriteLite website.

  • wwrite and wwriteLite 6.2.2 Now Availabile

    wwrite and wwriteLite 6.2.2 Now Availabile

    There has been another update to wwrite and wwriteLite to version 6.2.2. This update actually fixes a bug that was caused by version 6.2.1. This fixes the identifiers for iOS devices.

    You can purchase wwrite for $0.99 or you can get wwriteLite for free, but it is ad-supported with first-party ads. As always, if there are any issues let me know.

  • wwrite 6.1.0 and wwriteLite 6.1.0 Now Available

    wwrite 6.1.0 and wwriteLite 6.1.0 Now Available

    There has been a minor update to my apps, wwrite and wwriteLite. Version 6.1.0 is a minor update of each app and the only change is that it adds support for the new iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro, and 4th Generation iPad Air. These are both free updates for existing users and wwrite can be purchased for $0.99.

  • wwrite 5.3.1 and wwriteLite 5.3.1 Now Available

    wwrite 5.3.1 and wwriteLite 5.3.1 Now Available

    There is a minor update to both wwrite and wwriteLite. There is only one tweak which is to the Feature Request screen. The entire screen has been reworked to accommodate smaller screens and the submit button is now at the top of the screen instead of the bottom.

    As always these are free updates for existing users.

  • wwrite 5.3.0 and wwriteLite 5.3.0 Now Available

    wwrite 5.3.0 and wwriteLite 5.3.0 Now Available

    I have released new versions of wwrite and wwriteLite. These are a minor update that provides a few new features and some tweaks. The biggest changes are the new Sentiment icon and the ability to show only Family-Friendly ads.

    New Features

    • Added Sentiment option which shows how positive your text is. 0 – 33 is negative, 33 to 66 is neutral, and 66 to 100 is positive.
    • There is a new option to only show “Family Friendly” ads. This is available by going to Tools -> Settings -> Family Friendly Ads. (wwriteLite only)
    • The Paragraph count of the current file is now in the “Info” panel.
    • Want a new feature? Use the new “Feature Request” option available under Tools -> Support. This is entirely anonymous with no email necessary.

    Tweaks

    • Added additional debug information. Debug information will now be sent to support when you send an email.
    • Added error logs, which will be included with any email to support.
  • Apple Updates Logic Pro X with Focus on Musicians

    Apple Updates Logic Pro X with Focus on Musicians

    Today Apple released Logic Pro X 10.5. According to Apple, this is the “biggest update to Logic since the launch of Logic Pro X”. The primary focus of this update is around a few new features including professional version of Live Loops, a completely redesigned sampling workflow, and new beat-making tools.

    Live Loops

    With Live Loops on the Mac, Logic users can now create music in new freeform and nonlinear ways. Loops, samples, and recordings can be organized into a new musical grid, where musicians can spontaneously perform and capture different arrangement ideas into the timeline. From there, tracks can be further refined using all of the professional production features in Logic.

    Remix FX enhances Live Loops with an exciting collection of electronic effects like Bitcrusher, filter, gater, and repeater that can be performed in real time over individual tracks or the entire song mix. Both features become even more powerful when using the free Logic Remote app, allowing users to pair their iPhone or iPad with their Mac to provide Multi-Touch control over Live Loops and Remix FX.

    Quick Sampler

    Quick Sampler is a fast and simple way to turn any individual sound into a playable instrument. Musicians can pick a sound from within Logic, the Finder, Voice Memos, or even record directly into Quick Sampler. With just a few clicks, an imported sample can be trimmed, looped, and played across a keyboard controller, with access to creative sound-shaping controls.

    Logic Remote

    Along with Logic Pro X being updated, the free companion app Logic Remote has also been updated. Logic Remote for iOS that will allow you to trigger your sounds within Live Loops or even apply a Remix FX to your session.

    Closing Thoughts

    This is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to new features. For a full listing, check out the press release.

    I will be the first to say that I am not a musician in any way. Yes, I enjoy listening to music, but I doubt I could ever create a full song. However, if you have used Logic Pro X to create your own music, this update should make it a much better experience. That is not me saying that, but instead Finneas O’Connell, Grammy Award-winning producer of artist Billie Ellish states:

    “Logic Pro X has always been my one and only DAW. The workflow is unmatched, and the built-in sound libraries have been essential to my music from the beginning. Now with the addition of Quick Sampler and Drum Machine Designer, I’m getting back hours I used to spend in the studio building sounds and kits. This lets me spend more time writing new verses and editing 70-take vocals.”

    Logic Pro X is a free update for existing customers, or $199 to purchase. If you are not sure that Logic Pro X is right for you, there is a seven-day free trial at https://www.apple.com/logic-pro/.

    Source: Apple

  • Apple Updates 13-inch MacBook Pro

    Apple Updates 13-inch MacBook Pro

    Today Apple released a refreshed 13.3-inch MacBook Pro. Amongst the changes are a new keyboard, increased base storage, and new processors. Let us look at these in detail.

    Across the Board Changes

    There are four different configurations that Apple presents on their page. There are the two lower-end models and two higher-end models. A majority of the changes only apply to the higher-end models. However, there are changes that have occurred across the board.

    The first change is that the keyboard mechanism has gone from the butterfly mechanism back to a scissor switch mechanism. As you might expect, Apple has decided to name these keyboards “Magic Keyboards”. The Magic Keyboard is the same type introduced with the 16-inch MacBook Pro. This means that it has 1mm of travel, an inverted-T arrow configuration and a physical escape key.

    With the 13-inch MacBook Pro getting a new keyboard, there are no current products that have the Butterfly keyboard mechanism in them. The 13-inch MacBook Pro was the last model to still have the butterfly keyboard.

    The second change that is across the line is the base storage. The lower-end models have gone from 128GB and 256GB respectively, to 256GB and 512GB respectively. The higher end model similarly gone from 256GB and 512GB to 512GB and 1TB respectively.

    Those are all of the changes that have occurred across the board. The higher-end models have seen some additional changes. Let us look at those now.

    Higher-end Model Changes

    In addition to the base storage and keyboard changes, the higher-end 13.3-inch MacBook Pros have seen additional changes, including memory speed and processor changes.

    The processors available for the higher-end MacBook Pros are the 10th generation Intel processors. Both models come with a 2.0GHz quad-core processor that can go up to 3.8GHz with turbo boost. These can be configured with a 2.3GHz 10th generation Core i7 that can go up to 4.1GHz with Turbo Boost.

    With the processor update, the speed, and type, of memory has changed. These higher-end models now have LPDDR4X memory that runs at 3733Mhz.

    The faster memory in conjunction with the processor upgrades will allow, according to Apple, “ up to 80 percent faster performance over the previous generation 13-inch MacBook Pro for 4K video editing, faster rendering, and smoother gameplay.

    The last big change with the graphics is that you can connect it to a Pro Display XDR for full 6k resolution, which will be good for those who have a Pro Display XDR monitor and would like to connect a MacBook Pro to it for displaying something.

    Closing Thoughts

    The updated 13-inch MacBook Pro are available to order today and start at $1299 for the base model with 256GB of storage and the 1.4GHz Quad-Core 8th-generation processors. If you are a student, you can get a discount and the price starts at $1199 for the base model. They will begin shipping this week.

    If you were holding off on purchasing a new MacBook Pro until Apple refreshed them, then now is the time to buy.

    Source: Apple.com

  • wwrite 4.5.1 and wwriteLite 4.5.1 are now available

    wwrite 4.5.1 and wwriteLite 4.5.1 are now available

    wwrite 4.5.1 and wwriteLite 4.5.1 are now available. These are minor updates that add support for the latest 10.2-inch iPad, and the iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and the iPhone 11 Pro Max.

    New Features

    • Added support for 10.2-inch iPad, iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max.

    Bug Fixes

    • Fixed an issue with the ad refresh not working properly. (wwriteLite only)

    These are free updates and are available in the App Store now.

  • Apple releases minor updates to the MacBook Pro with Touch Bar

    Apple releases minor updates to the MacBook Pro with Touch Bar

    Today Apple released an update to some of MacBook Pro laptops. Specifically, the MacBook Pros with Touch Bar. These are minor updates, and are only updates of the processors. There is also a change surrounding the keyboard, but more on that in a bit.

    The 13-inch MacBook Pros with Touch Bar have gotten a processor bump. You now get an 8th generation 2.4GHz quad-core Core i5 processor with 128GB of eDRAM. You can configure a 2.8GHz quad-core Core i7 with 128GB of eDRAM. The remainder of the items like the memory, video card, and storage all remain the same as the previous models.

    The 15-inch MacBook Pro models has two different tiers. The less expensive tier comes with a 9th Generation 2.6GHz six-core Core i7 processor. The improvement with the processor comes with the L3 cache, which has 33% more, at 12MB. The more expensive tier comes with a 9th Generation 8-core 2.3GHz Core i9 processor with 16MB of L3 Cache. This is an increase of 77%, up from 9MB.

    Both of these 15-inch are configurable with an 8-core 2.4GHz Core-i9 processor. The remainder of the items like memory, video card, and storage remain the same as the previous models.

    Apple indicates that these new processors are twice as fast as the previous quad-core models, and 40% faster than the 6-core models.

    The Keyboard

    I am going to quote Matthew Panzarino of TechCrunch:

    Today, however, they told me they’re taking three explicit steps to help with the keyboard situation:
    1. The MacBook Pro keyboard mechanism has had a materials change in the mechanism. Apple says that this new keyboard mechanism composition will substantially reduce the double-type/no-type issue. Apple will not specify what it has done, but doubtless tear-downs of the keyboard will reveal what has been updated.
    2. Though Apple believes this change will greatly reduce the issue, it is also including all butterfly keyboards across its notebook line in its Keyboard Service Program. This means that current MacBook Pros and even the models being released today will have keyboard repairs covered at no cost, in warranty and out of warranty.
    3. Apple tells me that repair times for keyboards have been longer than they would like. It is making substantial improvements to repair processes in Apple Stores to make repairs faster for customers with issues.

    Closing Thoughts

    These new MacBook Pros are available for order today. The processor updates are minor ones, but it is good to see Apple keeping the processors up to date. More importantly, I think it is good to see Apple taking real action with the keyboards. Will this new keyboard ultimately fix the problems that have been occurring with the MacBook Pros? We will not know for a while, or until Casey Johnston tries out the new MacBook Pros and see if she has any issues, because she seems to be the one who has the most experience with the problematic keyboards.

    Source: Apple and TechCrunch.